Rebecca Catto – Assistant Professor, Kent State University
Email: rcatto@kent.edu
Website

Rebecca Catto is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Kent State University. She holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of Exeter in the UK. Her research interests include science and religion, non-religion and secularity, world Christianity, and interfaith dialogue. She has also published articles on youth and religion and state-religion relations. She is Co-Principal Investigator on the £3.4 million ‘Science and Religion Exploring the Spectrum: A Global Perspective’ running in eight countries.


Esther Chan – Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Email: esther.chan@yale.edu

Esther Chan is an Assistant Professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She received her Ph.D. in sociology at Yale. Her research interrogates dimensions of religion, race, gender identity, and sexuality in science, medicine, and higher education. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative methods, she has published in Public Understandings of Science, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion


Di Di – Assistant Professor, Santa Clara University
Email: ddi@scu.edu
Website

Di Di is an Assistant Professor at Santa Clara University. She completed her PhD in Sociology at Rice University in 2019. Her research interests include sociology of religion, science, gender, and immigration, especially from a cross-national comparative perspective. Her current work focuses on how people are constrained and enabled by different sets of institutional norms, such as science and religion.


Justin Farrell – Assistant Professor, Yale University
Email: justin.farrell@yale.edu
Website | Curriculum Vitae

Justin Farrell is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. His work focuses on environment, politics, morality, and religion. He completed his PhD in Sociology at the University of Notre Dame in 2013.


Silke Guelker – Research Fellow, University of Leipzig
Email: silke.guelker@uni-keipzig.de
Website | Curriculum Vitae

Silke Guelker received her doctoral degree (Dr.phil) in Political Science from the Free University in Berlin, Germany, and her Habilitation in Sociology from the University of Leipzig. She has been working in the field of science studies for many years and is interested in the relationship between science and religion from a sociology of science and a sociology of knowledge perspective. For her recent book ‘Transzendenz in der Wissenschaft’ she conducted ethnographic fieldwork in two stem cell research labs, one in the United States and one in Germany.  Currently, she is working on a project about constructions of ‘(un-)availability’ of health and disease based on case studies in the United States, Brazil, and Germany.


Jeff Guhin – Assistant Professor, University of California Los Angeles
Email: guhin@soc.ucla.edu Website
Website

Jeff Guhin received his PhD in Sociology from Yale University in 2013. His first book, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, is a comparative ethnography of two Sunni Muslim and two Evangelical Christian high schools in the New York City area with a special focus on science and religion in the classroom. He is actively pursuing projects examining creationism in Christian and Muslim contexts.


Jonathan Hill – Associate Professor, Calvin University
Email: jph27@calvin.edu

Jonathan P. Hill is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Calvin College. He is author of Emerging Adulthood and Faith (Calvin College Press, 2015) and coauthor of Young Catholic America: Emerging Adults In, Out of, and Gone from the Church (Oxford, 2014) and The Quest for Purpose: The Collegiate Search for a Meaningful Life (SUNY, 2017). He has published articles and book chapters on higher education and religious faith, volunteering, and charitable giving. He also directs the National Study of Religion and Human Origins, a project that explores the social context of beliefs about human origins.


David R. Johnson – Assistant Professor, University of Nevada, Reno

Email: davidrjohnson@unr.edu
Website | Curriculum Vitae

David R. Johnson is Assistant Professor of Higher Education at the University of Nevada, Reno. He specializes in the sociology of science, higher education, and policy. His research on science and religion includes articles on the religiosity of scientists, the influence of religion on public understanding of science, the implications of religion for public confidence in higher education, and science policy, among others. These publications can be found in journals such as Sociological ScienceSocial Science Quarterly, Public Understanding of Science, and The Journal of Higher Education. He is also co-author of Secularity and Science: What Scientists Around the World Really Think About Religion (Oxford University Press, 2019) and a forthcoming book on atheism.


Tom Kaden – Faculty Member, University of Bayreuth, Germany
Email: tom.kaden@uni-bayreuth.de

Tom Kaden is a sociologist of religion working in the Department of Cultural Sciences at the University of Bayreuth. Tom’s research interests include fundamentalism, the relationship between science and religion, and creationism. He is author of Creationism and Anti-Creationism in the United States: A Sociology of Conflict (Springer, 2019)and co-editor of the volume Science, Belief and Society. International Perspectives on Religion, Non-Religion and the Public Understanding of Science (Bristol University Press, 2019). He also serves as Co-Investigator Germany in the Project Science and Religion: A Global Perspective.


Simranjit Khalsa – Assistant Professor, University of Memphis
Email: skhalsa@memphis.edu

Simranjit Khalsa is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Memphis. Broadly, her research seeks to illuminate the many connections among religion, race, ethnicity, and immigration, showing how their intersection shapes the minority experience. Her current project examines these intersections in the case of the Sikh community in the US and England and she is developing a book based on this research. Another stream of her research examines the intersection of religion, spirituality, and work. Her work is published in journals such as Sociology of ReligionSocial Problems, and Socius.


Jamie Kucinskas – Assistant Professor, Hamilton College
Email: jkucinsk@hamilton.edu
Website | Curriculum Vitae

Jaime Kucinskas is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Hamilton College. Her research interests span sociology of religion, social movements, science, organizational and cultural change, and inequality. Her work centers on how people mobilize for, as well as resist, change within and across organizations and fields. She also studies spiritual experiences across different settings. Kucinskas is the author of The Mindful Elite: Mobilizing from the Inside Out (Oxford University Press, 2019) and has published in journals such as the American Journal of SociologyJournal for the Scientific Study of Religion, and Sociology of Religion.


David E. Long – Assistant Professor, Morehead State University
Email: dlong@moreheadstate.edu

David E. Long holds a PhD in the Study of High Education from the University of Kentucky.  His primary research follows two tracks. One focuses on the cognitive, social, and philosophical dimensions of student and teacher understanding of evolution, climate change science, and genetic engineering. Another examines how political and religious ideology mediates science education implementation in schools, universities, and in the civic discourse. His work appears in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Cultural Studies of Science Education, Ethnography &Education, and Anthropology and Education Quarterly.  He is author of Evolution and Religion in American Education: An Ethnography (Springer).


Marcus Mann – Assistant Professor, Purdue University
Email: mmannml@purdue.edu

Marcus Mann is an assistant professor of sociology at Purdue University. His overarching interest is in how conflicting cultural knowledge authorities affect individuals’ perceptions of science, politics, religion, and reality more generally. He has studied this general question in the context of atheist social movements, polarization in political media, and attitudes toward science and scientists. Currently he is working on several projects related to political media diets and susceptibility to political disinformation and extremism.


Shiri Noy – Assistant Professor, Denison University
Email: snoy@denison.edu
Website

Shiri Noy is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Denison University. Her research interests are in political culture, globalization, and development. She is currently working on projects that explore public perspectives on science and religion, both in the United States and cross-nationally using nationally representative cross-national data.

Kathleen (Casey) Oberlin – Independent Researcher
Email: coberlin@gmail.com

Kathleen (Casey) Oberlin is a researcher based in Chicago. Formerly, she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Grinnell College. Her research examines why and how we find some social movement’s claims more plausible than others when they build their own institutions. Her forthcoming book, Creating the Creation Museum: How Fundamentalist Beliefs Come to Life (NYU Press, December 2020) is based on over three years of fieldwork completed at the Creation Museum in Kentucky built by Answers in Genesis, an organization tied to the broader Young Earth Creationist movement.


Timothy L. O’Brien – Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Email: obrien34@uwm.edu
Website

Timothy L. O’Brien is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is broadly interested in how people think about science and religion, and how these beliefs relate to people’s social environments. He is currently working on projects that examine the moral and political meanings people give to science and religion, how these meanings have changed over time, and how they relate to political conflict.


Rachel Schulder Abrams Pear – Research Fellow, University of Haifa
Email: RachelSAPear@gmail.com

Rachel S. A. Pear is a fellow at the University of Haifa’s Center for Jewish and Democratic Education where she is the research coordinator of the Templeton World Charity Foundation funded project “Dialogue in Science and Religious Education” that explores the teaching of religious and scientific perspectives on origins in Israeli Jewish, Muslim and Chrsitain schools. She additionally co-teaches the first continuing education course for teachers on Judaism and evolution in Israel through Herzog College of Education. Rachel received an AB from Columbia College, an MA in Prehistoric Archaeology from Hebrew University, and a PhD from Bar-Ilan University within the Graduate Program on Science Technology and Society, where her dissertation examined changes in Jewish American engagement with evolution over the course of the 20th century.


Jared Peifer – Assistant Professor, Baruch College
Email: Jared.Peifer@baruch.cuny.edu
Website

Jared Peifer received his PhD in sociology from Cornell University in 2011 and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the sociology department at Rice University. Now an assistant professor of management at Baruch College, his expertise in economic sociology and sociology of religion inspires his focus on morality in the economic sphere. In particular, he focuses on economic phenomena that includes a moral dimension, such as socially responsible investing, charitable giving and anti-consumerism. He also focuses on the relationship between religiosity and attitudes toward the natural environment.


J. Micah Roos – Associate Professor, Virginia Tech
Email: jmroos@vt.edu

J. Micah Roos is an assistant professor of sociology at Virginia Tech. His research interests include knowledge, science, religion, culture, stratification, measurement, and quantitative methods. Dr. Roos’ primary research program examines truth claims in contested areas of knowledge in the United States, such as human evolution, and spillover effects to related but uncontested areas of knowledge. He is currently developing a new instrument to measure uncontested science knowledge in the United States, and is developing general tools to aid in scale creation and validation. He holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Chris Scheitle – Associate Professor, West Virginia University
Email: cpscheitle@mail.wvu.edu
Website | Curriculum Vitae

Chris Scheitle received his Ph.D. in sociology from Penn State University. He has published three books, over sixty scholarly articles, and has been awarded four major research grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). His most recent book, with Elaine Howard Ecklund, is Religion vs. Science What Religious People Really Think (2018, Oxford). One of his current NSF grants is examining the role of religion in the professional development of graduate students in the sciences.


Lukas Szrot – Assistant Professor, Bemidji State University
Email: lukas.szrot@bemidjistate.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Lukas Szrot is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Bemidji State University. His most recent research analyzed the historical relationship between religious group identity and environmental concern in the United States. Szrot is also interested in sociology of risk, environmental justice, public understanding of science, and social psychology of belief.


Brandon Vaidyanathan – Associate Professor, Catholic University of America
Email: rvaidyan@alumni.nd.edu Website
Curriculum Vitae

Brandon Vaidyanathan is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at The Catholic University of America. His research examines the cultural dimensions of religious, commercial, medical, and scientific institutions, and has been published in leading peer-reviewed journals. He is the author of Mercenaries and Missionaries: Capitalism and Catholicism in the Global South (Cornell University Press, 2019) and co-author of Secularity and Science: What Scientists Around the World Really Think About Religion (Oxford University Press, 2019). His ongoing research examines aesthetics and well-being in scientific careers in India, Italy, the UK, and the US; and mental health issues in religious communities in the US


M. Alper Yalcinkaya – Associate Professor, Ohio Wesleyan University
Email: mayalcin@owu.edu

M. Alper Yalcinkaya received his PhD in Sociology and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego, and is currently Assistant Professor of Sociology at Ohio Wesleyan University. His research focuses on contemporary and historical debates about science, religion, and morality, with an emphasis on the Muslim world. He is also interested in the historiography of science and religion in non-Western societies. In his forthcoming book, Yalcinkaya analyzes the discursive representations of science and religion in the 19th century Ottoman Empire, and the relations between the Ottoman debate on science and the construction of Ottoman citizenship. He is currently working on a project on the representations of science and scientists in 20th century Turkish conservative discourse.